Friday, June 22, 2012

P.I. Sweetheart or sleuth.....?


In a few weeks there will be another camera market at the Leederville Town Hall and I'm already getting a little excited at the prospect! One of the things I enjoy and find very tempting are the antique cameras like this early 1900's vest pocket camera made by the Eastman Kodak Co. which I bought a few years ago. Advertised as 'the soldier's camera' during WW1 and designed to slip into the uniform pocket, it has a flap at the back with a steel pen clipped next to it to write straight onto the negative while in camera.....
Then it was a challenge to see if I could find a film for it and actually take some photos.  My cousin who was coming out from England for a visit was able to locate the required A127 film at Jessops camera store and bring it out with him. Once the film was loaded (in the dark) it was lights, camera, action!! Despite having a tiny pinprick hole in the canvas and considering it's age, I think the results were pretty good oui.....
The thing that captured my imagination the most was the initials P.I scratched on the front of the camera in quite ornate scroll. Was this a gift to a soldier from his sweetheart as he went off to war, or was it used by a youngster who fancied themselves as a bit of a detective? Being a romantic I'm leaning towards the former, what do you think.....! TGIF have a good one....


27 comments:

  1. Wow! These are collector's items, especially with such a history. Simply brilliant.

    Have a nice day
    CL

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  2. I liked reading your post about this old camera. Polaroid is now growing old and I have one that was top of the line about 20 years ago. I assume it still works and should try it out. I also enjoyed the rest of the post.

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  3. Nice! I found an old but extremely good Leica in Siberia once.

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  4. What a fascinating post for the day! Collector's items indeed and being a romantic myself, I love your thoughts about its history! Hope you're getting ready for a fun weekend!

    Sylvia

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  5. I have some old cameras coming from my family. I find FABULOUS that you succeeded to take pictures with that one!The photos are full of charm, and about the story, well, let your heart speak.. :o)

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  6. What a marvelous find! And a great photo, considering the age! How neat!

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  7. I'd go with the sweetheart angle!

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  8. Oh, this is a very nice one, they are so ingenious made. The photo looks very well. I am always curious in histories, so I go for the sweetheart, but I am sure it is not true.

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  9. A wonderful piece of memorabilia Grace and those initials scrolled on the case just add to the uniqueness of it.

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  10. It was stolen from the Perth Institute. Did you develop the film or did you find someone who could?

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  11. Lovely piece of old gear, and even better tht it still takes pictures!

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  12. What an adventure !

    Congratulations upon these great pictures. And yes, the P.I. makes it a priceless piece itself. Please have a good Friday.

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  13. OMG that's fabulous. I have my late father-in-law's 1940-ish Kodak Sigma 6. He took stunning pictures with it during the war when he was training to be an intelligence officer. Some day I'll get it fixed.

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  14. I don't think any digital camera will ever do as well as this in 100 years...

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  15. What an amazing find! Those pictures couldn't be more perfect. I go for the romantic interpretation too! Lovely post :)

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  16. Very interesting. It was of course illegal for Brits to take cameras to war at that time, for security, but Anzacs were a law unto themselves, and Germans took cameras freely! The fact the camera is there indicates he returned but probably served at Gallipoli and Poziers with the 29th Div. Good luck to him!

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  17. Thanks for sharing your memories, pictures and so wonderful vintage cameras.Lots of feelings in this post, it's really great!
    :)
    Hugs and a nice weekend,
    Léia

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  18. Can't believe you actually found a film for one of those vintage cameras not to mention taking a photograph with it. Good luck at the upcoming fair.

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  19. What a great find Grace, and wonderful post- I like the photos taken with it- it is inspiring how simple can also be effective!

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  20. Hey that's pretty amazing Grace. How did you develop the film? Do you have your own darkroom, I can't imagine there is any commercial company left that would do it now...?

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  21. Amazing object of old times...Arianna

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  22. A very good friend of mine who is super creative shot an entire movie with a restored 1900 camera. It's called 'Londoners'. Check it here: http://www.wired.com/underwire/2012/03/the-londoners-joseph-ernst/
    Actually, some previous 'crazy' ideas got him awards in festivals in several countries.

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  23. What fun! Somewhere I have 2 or 3 old cameras that used to take fabulous photos. I'll have to dig those out.

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  24. Fabulous, Grace, and I am totally impressed by the two photos you made. Please let us know a followup on this if you discover more.

    Me? I say the sweetheart story 'cause that's what I want to believe...

    bises
    Genie

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  25. Picture in general -love them - they remind us of good times and sad - but remembering is good. Love you style Gracie and no not bias :)

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  26. Congrats! I would have guessed you couldn't get a decent picture even if you could have found film...and you did it! Sweetheart it is! You romantic, you!

    I've got a bunch of film cameras...some older and some new. I've got the Nikon F100 which is in mint condition and the Nikon F4s, which is a fine camera. But I'm no longer shooting film. So they all sit in a box, sad and lonely!

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