Wednesday, April 25, 2012

'Stand-to' in 1915.....


Today is Anzac Day (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) here in Australia and New Zealand. A day that commemorates the men and women who died and served in military operations for their countries. The dawn service held in Kings Park where the memorial sits high overlooking the city (above) is incredibly moving and is attended by all ages ranging from the very young to surviving veterans.  So it's off to bed early tonight and up at around 4.30 am to get into the city before sun up, hope to have some images to share on Thursday, looking forward to watching the sun rising in the hills behind the city. For those of you that are interested in battles, this is how it happened..The Gallipoli Campaign as described in Wikipedia. Have a wonderful Wednesday and I'll catch up tomorrow.....!

In 1915, Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of an Allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli Peninsula, according to a plan by Winston Churchill to open the way to the Black Sea for the Allied navies. The objective was to capture Constantinople, the capital of the Ottoman Empire, which was an ally of Germany during the war. The ANZAC force landed at Gallipoli on 25 April, meeting fierce resistance from the Ottoman Army commanded by Mustafa Kemal (later known as Atatürk). What had been planned as a bold strike to knock the Ottomans out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915, the Allied forces were evacuated after both sides had suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships. The Allied casualties included 21,255 from the United Kingdom, an estimated 10,000 dead soldiers from France, 8,709 from Australia, 2,721 from New Zealand, and 1,358 from British India. News of the landing at Gallipoli made a profound impact on Australians and New Zealanders at home and 25 April quickly became the day on which they remembered the sacrifice of those who had died in war.
Though the Gallipoli campaign failed to achieve its military objectives of capturing Constantinople and knocking the Ottoman Empire out of the war, the actions of the Australian and New Zealander troops during the campaign bequeathed an intangible but powerful legacy. The creation of what became known as an "Anzac legend" became an important part of the national identity in both countries. This has shaped the way their citizens have viewed both their past and their understanding of the present.

35 comments:

  1. History is clear about this: their legend lives on and they will be remembered forever.

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  2. Beautiful post Grace! Thank you. I just watch Gallipoli the movie. With a very young Mel Gibson.

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  3. I'm anxious to see your Stand-to pictures.

    We had the ANZAC Day service in Jerusalem today, a day early.

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  4. Gallipoli will always stay in memories . Moving tribute!

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  5. Wonderful post today, Grace. Looking forward to seeing your photos tomorrow!

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  6. I remember Gallipoli from my school days (long time ago, snicker!) about the great butchery that was WWI. Have a wonderful ANZAC day!

    (I'm fine, thanks for asking Grace. Just routine visit to the doctor's after a sprained ankle!)

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  7. I used to work as a tour guide in Turkey, and I brought many people to Gallipoli (or Gelibolu, as it is called in Turkish). Very moving.

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  8. I had heard of the Gallipoli expedition but never knew the background. Thank you for the historical comments! It's an interesting monument, but I have a question re the cross. Was everyone involved of the Christian faith or were other faiths represented in those military operations you mentioned?

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  9. la photo de nuit est magnifique

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  10. What a wonderful, beautiful tribute, Grace! One for all of us to remember, to honor and to be thankful for! Thank you so much for sharing this! I knew about it, but not as much as I do now, thanks to you! Such magnificent photo indeed!

    Sylvia

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  11. If our 'leaders' were as amazing as our common servicemen and women, things would be MUCH better for all the world. I salute you folks who always stand up for the right and have been the MOST stalwart of allies to my nation. Bless ANZAC!

    Aloha from Waikiki
    Comfort Spiral

    > < } } (°>

    ><}}(°>

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  12. Great shot and post. God bless those folks who answer the call to serve.

    Darryl and Ruth :)

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  13. My respect for those fallen heroes and living veterans!
    Nice post Grace... ;)

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  14. congrats...
    treasure the days when those brave men and women fought for Anzac..

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  15. This is your version of our US Memorial day. Held on the last Monday of May we remember those who died in service of their country. As time has gone by it has become a time to also remember other family members who have died, or passed on as we say politely.

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  16. What a great nighttime shot, Grace!

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  17. Lest we forget...
    Great post, Grace!

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  18. I'm with Nick.. lest We Forget.

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  19. Interesting photo...I love ANZAC cookies...

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  20. Great post Grace. Lest we forget.

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  21. Something that is very close to my heart as you know - lovely post and thank you, P and A for being there. Look forward to seeing tomorrows post x

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  22. An important monument that honors the fallen of the war!!!

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  23. A picture like the one in this post is indeed better than intruding on privacy. It evokes so much.
    I imagine the feeling of the dawn service is much different from the 11.00 a.m. formal commemoration that the Australians make in Jerusalem.

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  24. Hi Grace.

    Thanks much for responding to my question re the cross. We have much the same thing here, but in many areas those of other beliefs or no beliefs have registered dismay with such reasoning, arguing that the cross is not a happy symbol for them. Jewish people, for example, see the cross as a reminder of how terribly Christians have treated them down through the years.

    It's an interesting discussion. Hope you're having a great day!

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  25. Today I've visited two other blogs with this tribute and it's so interesting that all of you have chosen such different but such powerful images. A very special day for your country.
    V

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  26. Hi Gracie! Today is also a holiday in Portugal (Liberty Day, after the Revolution in 1974), but it’s the worst winter day we had since last October... As grey as if we were living in Northern Europe... So, the only right thing to do is surfing the Net... ;)

    Lovely blog! One day I'll get to Perth...

    Would love to see you at Blogtrotter Two, which is now in St. Kitts and Nevis... Enjoy and have a great week!!!

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  27. Interesting posting. (I guess I have read up on more than European History.)
    Nice documentary!

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  28. Now of course had I not been up to my ears in meetings yesterday I'd have read this then and known today that your post wasnt about AZTECs but ANZAC ... oy oy oy

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