Friday, April 4, 2014

The winds of change...



Picture the view from this very window in the old mill cottage when it was built in 1836.. scrub land all the way down to the Swan River, no buffer against the stiff breezes blowing up from the water, the perfect location for a windmill to produce flour for hungry colonists! 179 years later the chaotic Kwinana Freeway runs between the mill and the river. We've driven past The Old Mill without stopping so many times while crossing the Narrows Bridge from the north to south side of the river, this time we stopped to visit...


Built in 1835 the mill is the oldest surviving colonial structure in Perth.. since it ceased production in 1859 it's had a sometimes sad, sometimes colourful life! Rescued in 1992 it's now permanently listed on the heritage register for its 'architectural and historical significance' as a museum and beautifully looked after by the City of South Perth and volunteers...


Above as it was and below as it is now...


The description of the cottage you can see in the background made me smile.. 'typical of the times the cottage had two bedrooms, a kitchen and a sitting room'.. as far as I can tell apart from the missing 'inside loo' that pretty much sounds like a typical bedsit today n'est pas? btw that's the kitchen and laundry below :) Happy Friday, take care....


28 comments:

  1. That's a very distinctive looking windmill, Grace. It's wonderful that it's being preserved.

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  2. Wonderful shots of the old mill!

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  3. Oh, I am so glad that it's being preserved!! Wonderful old mill! Terrific captures as always, Grace!! Hope you're getting ready for a great weekend!! Enjoy!

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  4. Glad you decided to stop! Well worth the visit. :)

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  5. A beautiful old historic structure. We don't see these in the western half of the US but, there are still a few around in the Midwest and the east. I especially remember one I saw in Iowa and I have pictures of one that still works in Missouri.

    To answer your question, our summer temps average between 110 & 117 or 43 & 47C, however I have been here when we reached 122 or 50C.

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  6. It's a beautiful mill and I love the inside shots. Makes me want to go back a century (for a few days that is. I like electricity and my washing machine!)

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  7. I love these old windmills and hope to get access to one later in the year. People in those days knew their local geography so well that they knew exactly where to build them to get maximum benefit of the wind - I doubt if many people would have any idea where to site a windmill today.

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  8. A remarkable paean to the "good ol' days." It's been beautifully cared for and thus becomes a "monument" of sorts of pride for Perthians.

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  9. Great stuff! Super pictures and spoiled only by a freeway dumped in the wrong place!
    You must keep the heritage or you forget who you are!

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  10. Glad you were able to stop and share it with us. Glad they saved it.

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  11. The charming old mill. Fortunately, it has been preserved.

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  12. It makes me happy to see old buildings restored especially significant ones like this.

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  13. Lovely. Thanks for stopping. It appears much smaller than the Dutch windmills....but with the nice breeze I bet it was a little work horse!

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  14. Very nice Grace. I love the contrast from the old and now. Looks like Australia does like the States, change the very nice landmarks to a place that just lacks something -- like no highway near it.

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  15. That winding machine is to make sausage? I was given one, but it was too tedious to use.

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  16. The mill looks quite Dutch and the cabin is cozy. It compares favorably with some preserved old houses in the part of Kansas where Mrs. C grew up.

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  17. A great restoration and preservation project. Your photos told the story well.

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  18. The mill looks beautiful restored, and is quite old.

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  19. i'm glad the place was saved , and in such a pretty way!
    it was worth stopping!

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  20. Thank goodness for people power (and maybe Carman Lawrence!)

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  21. Ooh, what a good-looking windmill. Love the first photo too looking through the window

    Teaching English with Mr. Duncan
    A-Z of hotels

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  22. So good that it has survived and is now protected, Grace!
    I was in the booth for about an hour but they are friends so it was for a lot of catching up and not just shopping.

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  23. Good "before and after", i love first image! Arianna

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  24. Must´ve been a hard life back then. Good thing the mill is taken care for!

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  25. Great photos of this awesome and historical place. Structures like this are national treasure and should be treated as such.

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