Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Industrial archaeology.. Maylands Brickworks.



Every time I visit mon ami français Marie in the riverside suburb of Maylands I intend to stop and take shots of the old Maylands Brickworks.. this time I did. When it was built in 1927 it was the most modern of its kind in the state, the site chosen for its close proximity to the better quality of clay deposits along the Swan River.. 


The brickworks ceased operating in 1983 and was saved from demolition by strong public protest resulting in the area being preserved as a 'significant example of industrial archaeology'. Quite right! The Hoffmann Kiln here is one of only two that still exist in Australia. The process of brick making back then was incredibly labour intensive, it almost seems disrespectful to wipe out the memory of all that hard work don't you think?  Happy Wednesday, take care and stay safe... 


26 comments:

  1. Interesting building, I've never been to that area.. I like the "industrial archeology" quite funny.

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  2. Good stuff! I'd want to get right inside that for a picture.

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  3. I don't believe I've ever seen a brick-making enterprise. I guess I figured they came out of thin air! Glad the building was saved, and I enjoyed your super photos. Re your comment on Ocala: when have I ever tried to fool you? I'm just amazed that you would think such a thing. Heh, heh, heh. You're right, though. It's faux. Have a great rest of the week in that beautiful land down under.

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  4. A remarkable building, good that it was saved!

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  5. Industrial heritage is often ignored, so it is good that the brickworks were preserved.

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  6. It's great they decided to keep that building. I never thought of bricks being made but like everything else, there must be a way and there you have the building in which they made bricks. Nice post Grace. Have a wonderful Wednesday, aka hump day. It's all downhill toward the weekend after Wed but you probably already knew that. :)

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  7. That kiln building is an amazing thing to see. I don't think I've ever seen anything like it. My dad worked in a factory that made air compressors when he was in his 20's. It's hard sometimes to imagine how totally different factory work is now compared to back then.

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  8. I read your link about the Hoffmann kilns - quite fascinating and efficient, Grace!

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  9. Such a large amount of work to make/lay bricks. We have buildings/houses in my small town area where the bricks were made by slaves. Sad, but true.

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  10. It certainly IS a valuable cultural sight. But I suspect the expense of demolition was a factor when I look at those solid walls, G!

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  11. I'm glad it was saved because it is beautiful, especially the tower.

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  12. That is a great looking kiln. So glad it got saved from the wrecking ball. Surprised you could get so close to take photos.

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  13. ...so do all your bricks come form China now?

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  14. Bravo to those who protested its demolition . It is a great piece of history.

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  15. Those angled walls must have been difficult to create with bricks. Intriguing piece of architecture.

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  16. Excelente trabalho e belas fotografias.
    Um abraço e boa semana.
    Andarilhar

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  17. Good to preserve the brick building, that is a national heritage that has to be cherished indeed.

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  18. what a great old building, love the slanty walls!

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  19. I've not heard of a Holden Astra...is that an Aussie car?

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  20. They did good to save it from demolition !

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  21. A most remarkable design to this place. Very nice.

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  22. Industrial archaeology...probably safer than the kind Indiana Jones does!

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  23. Good thing people stand up for history, Grace.

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